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Dec 072019
 

Call for Articles: Special issue of Simulation & Gaming on Facilitation

Background
Simulations and games come in many forms –e.g. roleplay and face to face activities, boardgames, computer-based simulations, military exercises and technical (e.g. flight) simulators. Facilitation skills are acknowledged as vital components of successful use of all such activities; however, this has not led to extensive analysis of the skills involved in successfully enacting the role. This special issue of Simulation and Gaming intends to address this gap in the literature by providing a balanced perspective – drawing on both theory and practice to
_guide novice facilitators in developing their capabilities towards expertise
_assist expert facilitators to better understand the theoretical roots of their capabilities
_help those who commission simulations and games for learning – but do not direct facilitate them – understand the complex web of issues that contribute to achieving learning outcomes
_provide to the wider simulation community a framework for understanding and valuing the facilitator’s role, and the skills required of its occupants

Combining elements of theory with exposition of relevant practical skills, articles should explore aspects of what is/can be expected of a facilitator when a simulation/simulation game is in action. A tentative set of topics is listed below and this call for expressions of interest is intended to reach the widest possible range of potential authors, so please share it widely.

Content – possible questions and themes
We anticipate that articles may address such topics as those listed below. However, this is not a comprehensive list and we welcome responses from anyone interested in contributing to this vital aspect of the simulations and gaming body of knowledge.

What makes simulation and games a ‘special case’ when considering the task of facilitation?
What are the discernable differences between what was understood about the task and role of facilitation circa 1969 and what is now understood about its parameters in 2020? What are/might be the implications of such changes in understanding?
What existing work on the facilitator role, such as that done by the IAF (2019) and Kortman and Peters (2017), is relevant to developing expert simulation/games facilitation capabilities?
How do people acquire the skills required to work effectively in simulation contexts?
What do participants/commissioning agents need to know, to assess a facilitator’s capability?
How do 21st-century concepts such as ‘complexity’, ‘complex adaptive systems’, uncertainty, differing domains of knowledge, etc. impact on the work of the facilitator?
What is the scope of facilitation in the specific context of the ‘life cycle’ simulations and games from beginning (briefing) to end (debriefing) and beyond?
Stories from the trenches –this is envisaged as a collaborative effort. Authors are invited to contribute shorter case-study style reports of experiences anywhere on the spectrum from -“Excellent/Outstanding”…to…“Oh dear! Never Again, please!” (and places between)
The special edition team will add a commentary guiding readers through the ‘trenches’
Facilitation through the phases of simulations/games – briefing/action/debriefing. How does a novice facilitator decide what behaviour is relevant for each phase?
“It’s a poor workman who blames the tools” – exploring how things may go wrong and why the activity itself is seldom to blame but is scapegoated to avoid loss of face.
“What can go wrong? How to recover – when all seems lost?” – an exploration of recovery options after things have ‘gone wrong’
Exploration of theories/concepts helping to shape and inform facilitators’ capabilities including education, group dynamics, psychology, understanding of complexity as a factor in managing an activity, impact of personal learning preferences, etc.
What is needed to improve understanding of how facilitation skills are acquired and developed?
Case studies/stories from expert individuals outlining their paths to expertise, including pitfalls / learning points along the way
A meta-analysis of skills and knowledge involved in being an expert facilitator, perhaps including results of a survey of individuals considered by their peers to be experts
What do facilitators need to know about theories of learning (e.g. pedagogy, andragogy, heutagogy, constructivism and so on)?
How might better understanding of the role influence design and management of simulations and games and shape (and re-shape) the role of the facilitator?
Timeframe
We anticipate that this special issue may take up to twelve months to complete and invite abstracts from interested authors and writing teams to submit an abstract outlining your topic/theme and approach to addressing one or more of the questions and issues noted above.

This is the anticipated time frame for completion – it may change in accord with the journal requirements

November 2019 – Call for articles
February 2020 – Submission of abstracts
March 2020 – Notification of acceptance of abstract
May 2020 – First drafts of accepted papers –
July 2020 – Review of first drafts – peer review using journal procedures via SAGE website
September 2020 – Revisions and re-submissions in accord with journal requirements
November 2020 – Finalisation of issue requirements
Initial submission process
To facilitate the submission process, please use the following link to post your initial proposal.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BPN37faS4dJzHut3LuYlBpi-ub64D7CT

Items posted here will be transferred to a secure site, as they arrive.

Email for communication: elyssebeth@gmail.com

In your initial proposal please include:
1. Author names, email and affiliations, indicating the author of ‘primary contact’
2. Draft title (we accept this may change as your work is developed, so this is to give us an indication of possible themes)
3. Abstract – up to 500 words
a. at this first step we are looking for concepts and themes you will explore, referencing is optional, however we recommend that you check the links below for final submission guidelines as these will be rigorously applied once articles receive initial acceptance.
4. A note (i.e. text not be included in the word count) about your ability/willingness to help with reviewing.

Guidelines
Please visit the journal website at – https://journals.sagepub.com/home/sag

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Dec 072019
 

Game-based learning is the scientific area that focuses on the development of games that are designed over specific learning objectives. From thoroughly crafted educational games to the use of gamification, the new era of the school will be digital. However, we should not forget tangential learning with the use of entertainment games.

Mobile games are also leveraging a large community of gamers that relies on the specifics of mobile technology, such as ubiquity and pervasiveness. The solutions can leverage informal learning, literacy, science communication, and citizenship, among a vast area of applications.

The aim of this Special Issue is to disclose the new advances in game-based learning and mobile games that can enhance the effectiveness and outreach of learning objects.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:
Game-based learning;
Serious games;
Mobile games;
Pervasive games;
Learning models and practices with the use of games;
New technologies for game-based learning:
_Virtual and augmented reality;
_New interaction devices, toys, and playthings;
_Simulations;
_3D rendering technologies;
_Game engines and development tools;
_Location-based games;
_Artificial intelligence;
_Educational games analytics;
Assessment and evaluation of educational games;
User experience design;
The psychology of educational games;
Gender and age issues;
Social and collaborative games;
Security and confidentiality in educational games;
Case studies in educational games;
Game development for mobile devices.

+infos(oficial): https://www.mdpi.com/journal/information/special_issues/MobileGaming_Gamesbased_Learning

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Dec 072019
 

Um desvio para falar de videojogos..

“The Digital Games Research Section wants to extend the call to all scholars working in game studies. The section invites contributions dealing with digital games as cultural objects, digital gaming as a social practice, digital games as media for communication and related topics. Particular interest goes to understanding the cultural, psychological and sociological implications of digital gaming and of digital games as cultural objects and mass-market products, as well as serious applications of digital games. The section offers an interdisciplinary platform for exploring the impact and meaning of game culture(s). We welcome contributions dealing with topics traditionally associated with specific fields such as communication, but also humanities, media psychology, education science, economics and others. We deliberately aim for both qualitative and quantitative work in the belief that both deserve equal attention and are able to reinforce one another. We employ an inclusive definition of digital games as any game played on any digital device and explicitly do not limit the scope for submissions in this regard. The call is open for works dealing with both more traditional forms of digital gaming, ranging from nostalgia and retro gaming to newer innovations such as virtual reality, augmented reality, or location-based games.”

See the full call at http://www.ecrea2020braga.eu/2019/10/09/http-www-ecrea2020braga-eu-call-for-papers/

Deadline for abstracts is January 15, 2020.

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Sep 302019
 

A ler:
Strategies for Endogenous Design of Educational Games de Athavale Sandeep Dalvi Girish
Epistemological Issues in Understanding Games Design, Play-Experience, and Reportage de Howell Peter Stevens Brett
How to Reference a Digital Game de Gualeni Stefano Fassone Riccardo Linderoth Jonas
Discourse at play: construction and professionalism of video-based game reviews de Jacobs Ruud S Duyvestijn Zino
A Taxonomy of Game Engines and the Tools that Drive the Industry de Toftedahl Marcus Engström Henrik
The Comparative Self: Understanding the Motivation to Play and the Subsequent Video Game Use de Kordyaka Bastian Jahn Katharina Müller Marius Niehaves Björn
GDC vs. DiGRA: Gaps in Game Production Research de Engström Henrik
A Recipe for Disaster? The Emerging Ludo Mix and the Outsourcing of Narrative de Bjarnason Nökkvi Jarl
Building a Gamer: Player Preferences and Motivations Across Gender and Genre de Tomlinson Christine
Methods Beyond the Screen: Conducting remote player studies for game design research de Muscat Alexander Duckworth Jonathan Wilson Douglas

+infos(oficial): LINK

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Sep 242019
 

We cordially invite you to submit a manuscript for consideration and
possible publication in a Special Issue on “Advances in Mobile Gaming
and Games-based Leaning” to be published in an EI,
ESCI and Scopus-indexed open access journal Information
(http://www.mdpi.com/journal/information).

The submission manuscript deadline is 31 January 2020. For more
details, please visit the website:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/information/special_issues/MobileGaming_Gamesbased_Learning

You may share this invitation with your team members and colleagues;
co-authors are most welcome.

Please let me know within a month or as soon as possible if you and your
colleagues are interested in submitting a manuscript for this special
issue. If more time is needed, please feel free to tell us
(information@mdpi.com). Your contribution would be most welcome.

Information is fully open access. Open access (unlimited and free access
by readers) increases publicity and promotes more frequent citations, as
indicated by several studies. Open access is supported by the authors
and their institutes. An Article Processing Charge (APC) of CHF 1000
currently applies to all accepted papers. You may be entitled to a
discount if you have previously received a discount code or if your
institute is participating in the MDPI Institutional Open Access Program
(IOAP), for more information see: http://www.mdpi.com/about/ioap.

For further details on the submission process, please see the
instructions for authors at the journal website
(http://www.mdpi.com/journal/information/instructions).

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Sep 052019
 

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Sep 052019
 

Call for Chapters: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Narrative Aesthetics in Video Games

Proposals Submission Deadline: September 18, 2019
Full Chapters Due: January 16, 2020
Submission Date: May 10, 2020

Introduction

Each period creates its particular aesthetics. Developments in the scientific and technological fields affect art forms and accelerate their evolution. In time, the leading art movements of an era generate and exceed their own saturation of thresholds, transform their ‘deep-and-singular’ selves into ‘shallow-and-multiple’ selves. An art form that evolves by its internal dynamics and statics reaches the threshold of saturation, and finally becomes a ‘springboard’ upon which another art form can take further steps. This is how art forms evolve in interaction. In this context, video games have rapidly covered the path that cinema has taken over a long period.

By advancing through its evolution, video games now represent many narrative systems that provide a semantic reserve of form and content for both their own medium and the other mediums. These narrative systems have been inevitably subjected to the effects of technological developments. Meanwhile, concepts such as Mimesis, Diegesis, and Katharsis, which have remained valid since Aristotle, have dominated the narrative channels throughout the history of art given the enigmatic attractiveness of their singularities. As in everything, the principle of dialectic antagonism, which carries and expands all the layers of meaning by adding new particles as time progresses, stood against these concepts by revealing alternative systems like Brechtian, Modern and Postmodern narratives, particularly in theater and cinema. On the one hand, it can be claimed that there has always been a single narrative idea and it embodied in various mediums; on the other hand, it can also be claimed that each media could have inevitably created its own narrative system. In both cases, it is certain that almost every piece of art which conveyed by many other mediums or branches formed their own ontologic “present,” while feeding on the unalterable knowledge of the past. Sometimes by standing alongside the things they show, sometimes by standing up against, or sometimes by being only neutral observers to them.

Evolutionary big leaps in the history of art have always taken place with a dimensional expansion and Every successful thing goes beyond its predecessor. As the predecessor of video games, cinema took the first big leap and replicated the unique features of many previous art forms and synthesized them. The dimensional expansion here manifested as (detection of) movement. Afterward, video games replicated mostly all the features of cinema and others and synthesized them. The dimensional expansion here manifested as interactivity. Since video games synthesize unique features of various art forms, they have the qualified characteristics of expressing many meanings, elements, contents and methods that convey and construct narrative systems in various ways.

Objective

In this project, our Editorial Advisory Board and we will endeavor to read video games as one of the most potent and evolutionary representatives of narrativity, from a narrativist perspective without missing valuable arguments of ludologist perspective. As a collection of critical and cultural studies, this book aims to provide valuable knowledge of relevant theoretical and conceptual frameworks in both game studies and the theory of video games. This book also aims to be a manuscript that reassesses and interprets intensive topics of the history of video games from a contemporary and multidisciplinary perspective. I’ll be written for scholars, researchers, practitioners, and professionals who want to enhance their understanding and imply the knowledge of the relationship and correlation of video games, narrativity, and aesthetics.

Target Audience

The target audience of this book will be composed of scholars, researchers, practitioners, and professionals studying and/or working in the fields of game studies, history of video games, art and other arts, media arts, social and communication sciences, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies, media studies, critical and cultural studies, narration arts like cinema, theater, literature, photography and music, and game design.

Recommended Topics

Welcomed Topics Include (but also a combination of) the following:

• Analyzes through Narrative Discourse of Gerard Genette upon video games.
• Analyzes on video games with Erwin Panofsky’s Iconographic method.
• Linguistic Competence of Video Games: Emergence and maintenance of meaning codes, components, patterns, and systems.
• The appearance of Classic, Modern, and Postmodern narrative in video games.
• Exchange of narrative elements between art branches and video games.
• Analogical narrative design in video games.
• Relativist narrative design in video games.
• Perspectivist narrative design in video games.
• Structuralist narrative design in video games.
• Formalist narrative design in video games.
• Interpretivist narrative design in video games.
• Stylist narrative design in video games.
• Sophisticated content design in video games.
• Games that have complicated plots/superimpose narrative layers.
• Reading video games as a “representation system.”
• Games that replicate/transform cinematographic aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform photographic aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform literal aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform theatrical aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform musical aesthetics.
• The appearance of archetypes on video games/video game archetypes.
• The appearance of stereotypes on video games/video game stereotypes.
• The appearance of Kitsch, Pastiche, and Parody on video games.
• Mimetic, Diegetic, and Cathartic manifestations in video games.
• Epic, Poetic, and Didactic manifestations in video games.
• Theoretical analysis of narratology through video games.
• Historical analysis of narratology through video games.
• Sociological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Psychological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Anthropological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Dialogue, monologue & inner voice in the context of video game narrative.
• Narrative aesthetics through acting & dubbing in video games.
• The aesthetic function of the narrator in video games.

Submission Procedure

Scholars and researchers are invited to submit on or before Sept 18, 2019, a chapter proposal of 500 to 750 words (excluding bibliography) clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter and an author information 200 to 300 words. The authors will be notified by Oct 05, 2019 about the acceptance of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by Jan 16, 2020. All interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. 

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Narrative Aesthetics in Video Games.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates

Sept 18, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline 
Oct 5, 2019: Notification of Acceptance
Jan 16, 2020: Full Chapter Submissions
Mar 15, 2020: Review Results Returned
Apr 12, 2020: Revised Chapter Submission
May 10, 2020: Final Chapter Submission

Project Link
https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/4302

Editors

Deniz Denizel 
Bahcesehir University
deniz.denizel@comm.bau.edu.tr

Deniz Eyüce Şansal 
Bahcesehir University
deniz.eyucesansal@comm.bau.edu.tr

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Sep 052019
 

Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018” por Monica anderson e Jingjing jiang

“YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat are the most popular online platforms among teens. Fully 95% of teens have access to a smartphone, and 45% say they are online ‘almost constantly'”

+infos(estudo): LINK

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Sep 052019
 

“Do you want to find out how games can enhance traditional teaching and learning and would like to include games elements in your classroom? This MOOC for teachers will examine the opportunities but also challenges offered by integrating games into our teaching and learning and will provide practical examples of gaming tools and activities to use in your daily teaching practice. We will be learning through a mix of video, interactive activities and discussions as well as sharing of resources.”

Módulos:
Module 1: Why use Computer Games in the classroom?
Module 2: Using Games for Thematic Learning
Module 3: Learning Games
Module 4: What can we learn from games?
Module 5: Designing Games
Module 6: Why is it important to teach about games?

Começa dia 14 de outubro..

+infos(o curso): LINK

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