Aug 102020
 

É sempre bom quando encontramos malta que seguimos a escrever sobre o tema de videojogos. Desta vez numa revista de acesso aberto e que todos podem ler 🙂
Vol. 5 No. 1 (2020): Videogames and Culture: Design, Art and Education, do qual destaco:
‘Videogametism’: Consolidating the recognition of video games as an art form” por Marco Fraga da Silva
The relation between gamers audiences and gaming industry workforce” por Ivan Barroso

+infos(oficial): LINK

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May 262020
 

Learning Java with Games de Xu, Chong-wei, 2018

“This innovative approach to teaching Java language and programming uses game design development as the method to applying concepts.

Instead of teaching game design using Java, projects are designed to teach Java in a problem-solving approach that is both a fun and effective. Learning Java with Games introduces the concepts of Java and coding; then uses a project to emphasize those ideas. It does not treat the object-oriented and procedure and loop parts of Java as two separate entities to be covered separately, but interweaves the two concepts so the students get a better picture of what Java is.

After studying a rich set of projects, the book turns to build up a “Three-layer Structure for Games” as an architecture template and a guiding line for designing and developing video games. The proposed three-layer architecture not only merges essential Java object-oriented features but also addresses loosely coupled software architecture. ”

+infos(oficial): https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319728858

Java in Two Semesters Featuring JavaFX de Quentin CharatanAaron Kans, 2018

“This easy-to-follow textbook teaches Java programming from first principles, as well as covering design and testing methodologies. The text is divided into two parts. Each part supports a one-semester module, the first part addressing fundamental programming concepts, and the second part building on this foundation, teaching the skills required to develop more advanced applications.

This fully updated and greatly enhanced fourth edition covers the key developments introduced in Java 8, including material on JavaFX, lambda expressions and the Stream API.”

+infos(oficial): https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-99420-8

 

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May 182020
 

Um livro grátis que debate o tema de: aprender com os jogos 🙂 que foi feito no âmbito do Erasmus+ LEVEL e GameON, e que envolveu várias Escolas portuguesas do secundário 🙂

+infos(oficial): http://eduproject.eu/game-based-learning/

 

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May 182020
 

“Press Start is a peer reviewed game studies journal that is run by graduate students and exclusively publishes student work” que fixe 🙂

+infos(oficial): https://press-start.gla.ac.uk/

 

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May 182020
 

Gostava de ter acesso/access to your article:


Lankoski, P. & Björk, S. (eds.) (2015). Game Research Methods: An Overview. ETC Press.
+infos(editora): LINK


Lankoski, P. & Holopainen, J. (eds.) (2017). Game Design Research: An introduction to theory & practice. ETC Press.
+infos(editora): LINK


Learning, Education & Games, Volume 3: 100 Games to Use in the Classroom & Beyond, editado por Karen Schrier
+infos(editora): LINK

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May 162020
 

Gostava de ter acesso/access to your article:

Computers and Creativity. Editors: McCormack, Jon, d’Inverno, Mark (Eds.)

+infos(oficial): https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642317262

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Mar 142020
 

Gostava de ter acesso/access to your article:
S. Wu, “The Development and Challenges of Computational Thinking Board Games,” 2018 1st International Cognitive Cities Conference (IC3), Okinawa, 2018, pp. 129-131.
Savvani S., Liapis A. (2019) A Participatory Approach to Redesigning Games for Educational Purposes. In: Liapis A., Yannakakis G., Gentile M., Ninaus M. (eds) Games and Learning Alliance. GALA 2019. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 11899. Springer, Cham
Use of a board game format to promote interprofessional learning. Heather Schmucka, Mary KayArvinb
Peter Drake and Kelvin Sung. 2011. Teaching introductory programming with popular board games. In Proceedings of the 42nd ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ’11). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 619–624. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/1953163.1953338
Wang, H., Chen, W., & Sun, C. (2020). Play Teaches Learning?: A Pilot Study on How Gaming Experience Influences New Game Learning. In P. Isaias, & K. Blashki (Eds.), Interactivity and the Future of the Human-Computer Interface (pp. 147-168). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-2637-8.ch008

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Feb 242020
 

Gostava de ter acesso/access to your article,
Kosa M., Spronck P. (2019) Towards a Tabletop Gaming Motivations Inventory (TGMI). In: Zagalo N., Veloso A., Costa L., Mealha Ó. (eds) Videogame Sciences and Arts. VJ 2019. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1164. Springer, Cham
Sousa M., Bernardo E. (2019) Back in the Game. In: Zagalo N., Veloso A., Costa L., Mealha Ó. (eds) Videogame Sciences and Arts. VJ 2019. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1164. Springer, Cham
Simons, A., Wohlgenannt, I., Weinmann, M. et al. Good gamers, good managers? A proof-of-concept study with Sid Meier’s Civilization. Rev Manag Sci (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11846-020-00378-0

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Dec 072019
 

Call for Articles: Special issue of Simulation & Gaming on Facilitation

Background
Simulations and games come in many forms –e.g. roleplay and face to face activities, boardgames, computer-based simulations, military exercises and technical (e.g. flight) simulators. Facilitation skills are acknowledged as vital components of successful use of all such activities; however, this has not led to extensive analysis of the skills involved in successfully enacting the role. This special issue of Simulation and Gaming intends to address this gap in the literature by providing a balanced perspective – drawing on both theory and practice to
_guide novice facilitators in developing their capabilities towards expertise
_assist expert facilitators to better understand the theoretical roots of their capabilities
_help those who commission simulations and games for learning – but do not direct facilitate them – understand the complex web of issues that contribute to achieving learning outcomes
_provide to the wider simulation community a framework for understanding and valuing the facilitator’s role, and the skills required of its occupants

Combining elements of theory with exposition of relevant practical skills, articles should explore aspects of what is/can be expected of a facilitator when a simulation/simulation game is in action. A tentative set of topics is listed below and this call for expressions of interest is intended to reach the widest possible range of potential authors, so please share it widely.

Content – possible questions and themes
We anticipate that articles may address such topics as those listed below. However, this is not a comprehensive list and we welcome responses from anyone interested in contributing to this vital aspect of the simulations and gaming body of knowledge.

What makes simulation and games a ‘special case’ when considering the task of facilitation?
What are the discernable differences between what was understood about the task and role of facilitation circa 1969 and what is now understood about its parameters in 2020? What are/might be the implications of such changes in understanding?
What existing work on the facilitator role, such as that done by the IAF (2019) and Kortman and Peters (2017), is relevant to developing expert simulation/games facilitation capabilities?
How do people acquire the skills required to work effectively in simulation contexts?
What do participants/commissioning agents need to know, to assess a facilitator’s capability?
How do 21st-century concepts such as ‘complexity’, ‘complex adaptive systems’, uncertainty, differing domains of knowledge, etc. impact on the work of the facilitator?
What is the scope of facilitation in the specific context of the ‘life cycle’ simulations and games from beginning (briefing) to end (debriefing) and beyond?
Stories from the trenches –this is envisaged as a collaborative effort. Authors are invited to contribute shorter case-study style reports of experiences anywhere on the spectrum from -“Excellent/Outstanding”…to…“Oh dear! Never Again, please!” (and places between)
The special edition team will add a commentary guiding readers through the ‘trenches’
Facilitation through the phases of simulations/games – briefing/action/debriefing. How does a novice facilitator decide what behaviour is relevant for each phase?
“It’s a poor workman who blames the tools” – exploring how things may go wrong and why the activity itself is seldom to blame but is scapegoated to avoid loss of face.
“What can go wrong? How to recover – when all seems lost?” – an exploration of recovery options after things have ‘gone wrong’
Exploration of theories/concepts helping to shape and inform facilitators’ capabilities including education, group dynamics, psychology, understanding of complexity as a factor in managing an activity, impact of personal learning preferences, etc.
What is needed to improve understanding of how facilitation skills are acquired and developed?
Case studies/stories from expert individuals outlining their paths to expertise, including pitfalls / learning points along the way
A meta-analysis of skills and knowledge involved in being an expert facilitator, perhaps including results of a survey of individuals considered by their peers to be experts
What do facilitators need to know about theories of learning (e.g. pedagogy, andragogy, heutagogy, constructivism and so on)?
How might better understanding of the role influence design and management of simulations and games and shape (and re-shape) the role of the facilitator?
Timeframe
We anticipate that this special issue may take up to twelve months to complete and invite abstracts from interested authors and writing teams to submit an abstract outlining your topic/theme and approach to addressing one or more of the questions and issues noted above.

This is the anticipated time frame for completion – it may change in accord with the journal requirements

November 2019 – Call for articles
February 2020 – Submission of abstracts
March 2020 – Notification of acceptance of abstract
May 2020 – First drafts of accepted papers –
July 2020 – Review of first drafts – peer review using journal procedures via SAGE website
September 2020 – Revisions and re-submissions in accord with journal requirements
November 2020 – Finalisation of issue requirements
Initial submission process
To facilitate the submission process, please use the following link to post your initial proposal.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BPN37faS4dJzHut3LuYlBpi-ub64D7CT

Items posted here will be transferred to a secure site, as they arrive.

Email for communication: elyssebeth@gmail.com

In your initial proposal please include:
1. Author names, email and affiliations, indicating the author of ‘primary contact’
2. Draft title (we accept this may change as your work is developed, so this is to give us an indication of possible themes)
3. Abstract – up to 500 words
a. at this first step we are looking for concepts and themes you will explore, referencing is optional, however we recommend that you check the links below for final submission guidelines as these will be rigorously applied once articles receive initial acceptance.
4. A note (i.e. text not be included in the word count) about your ability/willingness to help with reviewing.

Guidelines
Please visit the journal website at – https://journals.sagepub.com/home/sag

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Dec 072019
 

Game-based learning is the scientific area that focuses on the development of games that are designed over specific learning objectives. From thoroughly crafted educational games to the use of gamification, the new era of the school will be digital. However, we should not forget tangential learning with the use of entertainment games.

Mobile games are also leveraging a large community of gamers that relies on the specifics of mobile technology, such as ubiquity and pervasiveness. The solutions can leverage informal learning, literacy, science communication, and citizenship, among a vast area of applications.

The aim of this Special Issue is to disclose the new advances in game-based learning and mobile games that can enhance the effectiveness and outreach of learning objects.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:
Game-based learning;
Serious games;
Mobile games;
Pervasive games;
Learning models and practices with the use of games;
New technologies for game-based learning:
_Virtual and augmented reality;
_New interaction devices, toys, and playthings;
_Simulations;
_3D rendering technologies;
_Game engines and development tools;
_Location-based games;
_Artificial intelligence;
_Educational games analytics;
Assessment and evaluation of educational games;
User experience design;
The psychology of educational games;
Gender and age issues;
Social and collaborative games;
Security and confidentiality in educational games;
Case studies in educational games;
Game development for mobile devices.

+infos(oficial): https://www.mdpi.com/journal/information/special_issues/MobileGaming_Gamesbased_Learning

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