Feb 202020
 

This is just to remind you that the forthcoming Irish Conference on Game-Based Learning (iGBL2020), will be hosted in Cork on 25th and 26th June 2020.

The abstract submission deadline is the 22nd of February.

This conference provides a forum for all stakeholders interested in exchanging ideas, projects, and best practices on the use of games and game-based approaches to support motivation, learning, and change.

Researchers will be able to present and share their latest findings.
Students will have an opportunity to present their research or showcase their games, and meet specialists in this field to obtain constructive feedback.
Instructors will have the opportunity to share how they have used games in their classroom, discover new game-based teaching approaches and share new game-based skills that they can integrate into their teaching.
Companies will be able to showcase their products and explain how these can be used in the context of learning and motivation.

Prospective presenters can submit their abstracts through the online submission system.

We welcome abstracts from a wide range of stakeholders, including researchers, teachers, or students, who will have the opportunity to conduct workshops, present research results, or provide insights on how they managed to design or use games for educational or motivational purposes.

Important Dates
22nd of February: Final Abstract submission deadline.
25th of March: Notification of abstract acceptance.
25th of March: Successful abstracts are invited to submit an extended version to be published in the conference proceedings.
12th of April: Registration deadline for presenting authors.
12th of April: Submission of extended abstracts.
22nd of April: Notification of acceptance of extended papers.

+infos(oficial): http://www.igbl-conference.com/cfp/

Share
Feb 202020
 

G|A|M|E: The Italian Journal of Game Studies

Special Issue: “The Taboos of Game Studies”

Editors: Kristine Jørgensen (University of Bergen) and Riccardo Fassone (University of Torino)

The next issue of the Italian journal of game studies G|A|M|E (http://gamejournal.it/) welcomes contributions that address the taboos of game studies.

Taboos can be understood as social prohibitions based in religion or custom rather than in legislation or common sense, and are as such bearing moral weight (International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences 2001). Taboos can be found in all parts of society and guide our practices.

With its maturation, the field of game studies has been through several large debates, spanning the disputes about effects and learning, the so-called narratology versus ludology debate, and in the later years the impact of the #gamergate controversy on research and game culture. As game studies is a multidisciplinary field, such dissensions have been approached from a number of perspectives, as researchers bring their disciplinary paradigms and methodologies into game studies. In this multidisciplinary context, it becomes necessary to critically ask whether we are in a situation where nothing is taboo and everything is permitted, or whether the risk of public or disciplinary controversy makes certain topics or approaches untouchable.

At the same time, video games have historically been the center for a number of moral controversies over excessive violent content and other norm-breaking issues. While criticism and condemnation are not uncommon responses to such game content, in some cases an apologetic rhetoric is applied to the controversial content found in games, which claims that “these are only games.” However, while play research has demonstrated that the playful frame indeed may change the meaning of game content, it can also be argued that it is precisely this frame that makes games so good at treating taboo topics.

Focusing on the taboos of game studies, this issue asks ask whether there are topics that the field does not address, or whether there are perspectives or methods that are being avoided, either due to pressure from the research community itself, or from the society. How do game scholars guard their boundaries, and who is defined as insiders and outsiders? To what degree is game studies currently able to address the problematic aspects of game culture and playful practices? And concerning game content, is there such a thing as an ultimate taboo for game content? Do games have different taboos than other media, and what happens when taboo topics are addressed in a game context?

Topics may include:
The taboos of game studies
Game research into taboo areas
Research on games that deal with taboos
The breaking of in-game taboos
Game taboos in relation to other cultural forms (literature, cinema, art, design)

Scholars are invited to submit an extended abstract (between 500-1,000 words excluding references) or full papers for this special issue on the topics of the taboos of game studies to editors@gamejournal.it.

Timeline:
February 24, 2020: Extended abstract submission deadline (full papers are also accepted)
April 2, 2020: Notification of acceptance/rejection sent to authors
July 2, 2020: Full paper submission deadline
Sept 1, 2020: Review deadline
Oct 19, 2020: Deadline for edited papers

Share
Feb 202020
 

GAME-ON®’2020
The 21st annual Simulation and AI in Games Conference
Department of Communication and Art
University of Aveiro
(https://www.ua.pt/)
Aveiro, Portugal
September 23-25, 2020

CONFERENCE AIM
The aim of the 21st annual European GAME-ON® Conference (GAME-ON®’2020) on Simulation and AI in Computer Games, is to bring together researchers and games people in order to exchange ideas on programming and programming techniques, which will be beneficial to the gaming industry and academia. Secondly it aims to steer young people into this industry by providing how-to tutorials and giving them the opportunity to show their ideas and demos to the gaming industry. The conference will concentrate mostly on the programming of games, with special emphasis on simulation, AI and fuzzy sets, and physics related computer graphics. Next to that, all of this will be fused in the topic of computer game design in stand-alone and networked games. Software providers will be able to show their latest packages and give hand-on tutorials for the participants.

GAME-ON®’2020 consists of five core tracks, which cover, Gaming Methodology, Game Theory, Gamification, Artificial Intelligence and Simulation, while the other tracks cover peripheral technologies closely linked to games design, like 3-D scalability, facial and skeletal animation, 3D in-game animation etc, Mobile Gaming and Gaming
Applications such as Serious games and Gamification in different sectors; Organizational issues when implementing games; Designing games for learning; Technologies, tools and platforms for developing games for learning; Games to teach arts, science, or business; Social and collaborative aspects of game-based learning; Multi-modal aspects of game-based learning (e.g. audio, augmented reality, virtual reality, etc); Motivational aspects of game-based learning.

This year’s event features the following new topics Deep Learning, Evolutionary (Genetic) approaches combined with Deep Learning. Procedural Generation, Real-Time Ray-Tracing (RTRT), Real-Time Path-Tracing (RTPT), Hybrid Rendering and Mesh Shaders.

KEYNOTE
Procedural Content Generation Techniques applied to Game Design and Development
Davide Gadia, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy

INVITED TALKS
The Highs and Lows of Natural Language Learning Gamification
Maxim Mozgovoy, The University of Aizu, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima, Japan
Evaluation of a VR system for Pain Management using Binaural Acoustic Stimulation
Dr. Francisco José Perales López, Catedrático de Universidad CCeIA,
Dep. Matemáticas e Informatica, UIB, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears, Spain

TUTORIALS
Tutorials can be proposed in the following three categories:
* T1- Introductory Tutorials
* T2- State of the Art Tutorials
* T3- Software and Modelware Tutorials

Tutorial proposals should be emailed to Philippe.Geril@eurosis.org, by indicating the type of tutorial you would like to suggest. (T1, T2 or T3) before MARCH 1, 2020. A confirmation email will be sent to verify that the proposal was received.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS
All submissions will be peer reviewed by at least three members of the International Program Committee. Accepted papers will be published in the conference Proceedings (both print and electronic format), that will be copyrighted and widely disseminated.

Contributions to the technical program are solicited in the following general areas;

CONFERENCE THEMES
The conference will cover the following themes
– Games Development Methodology
– Game Theory/Multi-Agent Systems
– Gamification and Social Game Mechanics
– Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning
– Learning, Adaptation and Procedural Generation
– Intelligent/Knowledgeable Agents
– Collaboration & Multi-agent Systems
– Opponent Modelling
– Physics and Simulation/Graphical Simulation
– 3D Scalability
– Facial, Avatar, NPC, 3D in Game Animation
– Modelling of Virtual Worlds
– AI and Simulation Tools for games design
– Game Design
– Rendering Techniques, RTRT, RTPT
– Cognitive Psychology
– Affective Computing and Emotional Gaming
– Voice Interaction
– Artistic input to game and character design
– Storytelling and Natural Language Processing
– Online Gaming – Security Issues in Online Gaming
– MMOG’s
– Serious games and Gamification
– Wargaming Aerospace Simulations, Board Games etc…
– Games for training
– Games Applications in education, Government, health, Corporate
– Games Consoles
– Games Console Design
– Mobile Gaming and Vr Gaming
– Perceptual User Interfaces for Games

WORKSHOPS
Workshops on gaming, AI, simulation or software topics can be
proposed by MARCH 1, 2020.

POSTER SESSION
The poster session only features work in progress. Next to the actual
poster presentation, these submissions also feature as short papers in
the Proceedings.

PAPER SUBMISSION TYPES
EXTENDED PAPER
8 pages, single spaced, double column, including abstract, conclusions, diagrams, references).
During review, the submitted 8 PAGE EXTENDED papers can be accepted either as a regular 5 page paper or if excellent, full 8 page papers can be accepted by the program committee as an extended (8-page) paper for the conference proceedings.
Each submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the GAME-ON®’2020 International Program Committee.
Accepted extended papers are automatically published in a journal.

FULL PAPER
At least five pages, single spaced, double column).
Participants may also submit a 5 page paper for a regular (5 pages).
During review, the submitted 5 PAGE FULL papers can be accepted either as regular 5 page papers or if excellent, full 5 page papers can be accepted by the program committee as extended (8-page) papers for the conference proceedings.
Each submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the GAME-ON®’2020 International Program Committee

SHORT PAPER
At least three pages, single space, double column.
Participants may also submit a 3 page short paper. During review, the submitted 3 PAGE papers can be accepted either as a short 3 page paper or poster. or if excellent, 3 page papers can be accepted by the program committee as full five (5-page) paper for the conference proceedings.by the International Program Committee. All accepted
papers will be published in the GAME-ON®’2020 Conference Proceedings.

ONE AND TWO PAGE ABSTRACTS ARE NOT ACCEPTED.
CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS
Philippe Geril
EUROSIS-ETI
European Simulation Office
Greenbridge NV
Ghent University Campus Ostend
Wetenschapspark 1
Plassendale 1
B-8400 Ostend Belgium
Tel: OO32.59.255330
Email: philippe.geril@eurosis.org

OUTSTANDING PAPER AWARD
The 2020 GAME-ON Conference Committee will select the Outstanding Paper of the Conference. The author of this paper will be awarded a free registration for a EUROSIS conference. Only papers SUBMITTED AS FULL papers will be eligible for the Outstanding Paper Award.
The free registration is valid for 2 years after the event

LANGUAGE
The official conference language for all papers and presentations is English

IMPORTANT DEADLINES
EARLY BIRD SUBMISSION DEADLINE: APRIL 20TH, 2020
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MAY 15TH, 2020
LATE SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JUNE 1ST, 2020
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE OR REJECTION: JULY 3RD, 2020
Authors provide camera-ready manuscript: AUGUST 10TH, 2020
Conference at University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal, SEPTEMBER 23-25, 2020

+infos(oficial): https://www.eurosis.org/conf/gameon/2020/

Share
Feb 152020
 

O que é connected learning?
Uma aprendizagem que é construída tendo por base as oportunidades quando ocorrem: interesses comuns, oportunidades e entre os diferentes relacionamentos.

os autores indicam que:
“This report presents a vision for understanding and revitalizing the ways in which we support learning during these changing times. Responding to the interests and needs of young people, researchers, educational practitioners, and policy and technology makers, this report synthesizes a varied set of content and perspectives: empirical research on the changing landscape of new media and learning, design principles, evaluation approaches, learner and case studies oriented to identifying and spreading positive innovations. The authors were part of the Connected Learning Research Network (CLRN), an interdisciplinary group of scholars, designers, and educational practitioners, who collaborated between 2011 and 2019 to study and develop new modes of learning with digital media with the support of the MacArthur Foundation. Our guiding framework is the connected learning approach, first described in a report authored by the CLRN in 2013 (Ito et al. 2013). This report expands and revises key elements of this initial framework and report.”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Share
Feb 152020
 

Uma lista das conferências acerca de videojogos..

DiGRA (the Digital Games Research Association) +infos(https://digra2020.org/)
Foundations of Digital Games (FDG) +infos(http://fdg2020.org/)
The Irish Conference on Game-Based Learning (iGBL) +infos(http://www.igbl-conference.com/)
PUDCAD Universal Design Education Practice Conference +infos(http://pudcad2020conf.itu.edu.tr/)
Replaying Japan +infos(https://replaying.jp/)

 

Share
Dec 072019
 

Call for Articles: Special issue of Simulation & Gaming on Facilitation

Background
Simulations and games come in many forms –e.g. roleplay and face to face activities, boardgames, computer-based simulations, military exercises and technical (e.g. flight) simulators. Facilitation skills are acknowledged as vital components of successful use of all such activities; however, this has not led to extensive analysis of the skills involved in successfully enacting the role. This special issue of Simulation and Gaming intends to address this gap in the literature by providing a balanced perspective – drawing on both theory and practice to
_guide novice facilitators in developing their capabilities towards expertise
_assist expert facilitators to better understand the theoretical roots of their capabilities
_help those who commission simulations and games for learning – but do not direct facilitate them – understand the complex web of issues that contribute to achieving learning outcomes
_provide to the wider simulation community a framework for understanding and valuing the facilitator’s role, and the skills required of its occupants

Combining elements of theory with exposition of relevant practical skills, articles should explore aspects of what is/can be expected of a facilitator when a simulation/simulation game is in action. A tentative set of topics is listed below and this call for expressions of interest is intended to reach the widest possible range of potential authors, so please share it widely.

Content – possible questions and themes
We anticipate that articles may address such topics as those listed below. However, this is not a comprehensive list and we welcome responses from anyone interested in contributing to this vital aspect of the simulations and gaming body of knowledge.

What makes simulation and games a ‘special case’ when considering the task of facilitation?
What are the discernable differences between what was understood about the task and role of facilitation circa 1969 and what is now understood about its parameters in 2020? What are/might be the implications of such changes in understanding?
What existing work on the facilitator role, such as that done by the IAF (2019) and Kortman and Peters (2017), is relevant to developing expert simulation/games facilitation capabilities?
How do people acquire the skills required to work effectively in simulation contexts?
What do participants/commissioning agents need to know, to assess a facilitator’s capability?
How do 21st-century concepts such as ‘complexity’, ‘complex adaptive systems’, uncertainty, differing domains of knowledge, etc. impact on the work of the facilitator?
What is the scope of facilitation in the specific context of the ‘life cycle’ simulations and games from beginning (briefing) to end (debriefing) and beyond?
Stories from the trenches –this is envisaged as a collaborative effort. Authors are invited to contribute shorter case-study style reports of experiences anywhere on the spectrum from -“Excellent/Outstanding”…to…“Oh dear! Never Again, please!” (and places between)
The special edition team will add a commentary guiding readers through the ‘trenches’
Facilitation through the phases of simulations/games – briefing/action/debriefing. How does a novice facilitator decide what behaviour is relevant for each phase?
“It’s a poor workman who blames the tools” – exploring how things may go wrong and why the activity itself is seldom to blame but is scapegoated to avoid loss of face.
“What can go wrong? How to recover – when all seems lost?” – an exploration of recovery options after things have ‘gone wrong’
Exploration of theories/concepts helping to shape and inform facilitators’ capabilities including education, group dynamics, psychology, understanding of complexity as a factor in managing an activity, impact of personal learning preferences, etc.
What is needed to improve understanding of how facilitation skills are acquired and developed?
Case studies/stories from expert individuals outlining their paths to expertise, including pitfalls / learning points along the way
A meta-analysis of skills and knowledge involved in being an expert facilitator, perhaps including results of a survey of individuals considered by their peers to be experts
What do facilitators need to know about theories of learning (e.g. pedagogy, andragogy, heutagogy, constructivism and so on)?
How might better understanding of the role influence design and management of simulations and games and shape (and re-shape) the role of the facilitator?
Timeframe
We anticipate that this special issue may take up to twelve months to complete and invite abstracts from interested authors and writing teams to submit an abstract outlining your topic/theme and approach to addressing one or more of the questions and issues noted above.

This is the anticipated time frame for completion – it may change in accord with the journal requirements

November 2019 – Call for articles
February 2020 – Submission of abstracts
March 2020 – Notification of acceptance of abstract
May 2020 – First drafts of accepted papers –
July 2020 – Review of first drafts – peer review using journal procedures via SAGE website
September 2020 – Revisions and re-submissions in accord with journal requirements
November 2020 – Finalisation of issue requirements
Initial submission process
To facilitate the submission process, please use the following link to post your initial proposal.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BPN37faS4dJzHut3LuYlBpi-ub64D7CT

Items posted here will be transferred to a secure site, as they arrive.

Email for communication: elyssebeth@gmail.com

In your initial proposal please include:
1. Author names, email and affiliations, indicating the author of ‘primary contact’
2. Draft title (we accept this may change as your work is developed, so this is to give us an indication of possible themes)
3. Abstract – up to 500 words
a. at this first step we are looking for concepts and themes you will explore, referencing is optional, however we recommend that you check the links below for final submission guidelines as these will be rigorously applied once articles receive initial acceptance.
4. A note (i.e. text not be included in the word count) about your ability/willingness to help with reviewing.

Guidelines
Please visit the journal website at – https://journals.sagepub.com/home/sag

Share
Sep 302019
 

A ler:
Strategies for Endogenous Design of Educational Games de Athavale Sandeep Dalvi Girish
Epistemological Issues in Understanding Games Design, Play-Experience, and Reportage de Howell Peter Stevens Brett
How to Reference a Digital Game de Gualeni Stefano Fassone Riccardo Linderoth Jonas
Discourse at play: construction and professionalism of video-based game reviews de Jacobs Ruud S Duyvestijn Zino
A Taxonomy of Game Engines and the Tools that Drive the Industry de Toftedahl Marcus Engström Henrik
The Comparative Self: Understanding the Motivation to Play and the Subsequent Video Game Use de Kordyaka Bastian Jahn Katharina Müller Marius Niehaves Björn
GDC vs. DiGRA: Gaps in Game Production Research de Engström Henrik
A Recipe for Disaster? The Emerging Ludo Mix and the Outsourcing of Narrative de Bjarnason Nökkvi Jarl
Building a Gamer: Player Preferences and Motivations Across Gender and Genre de Tomlinson Christine
Methods Beyond the Screen: Conducting remote player studies for game design research de Muscat Alexander Duckworth Jonathan Wilson Douglas

+infos(oficial): LINK

Share
Sep 052019
 

Call for Chapters: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Narrative Aesthetics in Video Games

Proposals Submission Deadline: September 18, 2019
Full Chapters Due: January 16, 2020
Submission Date: May 10, 2020

Introduction

Each period creates its particular aesthetics. Developments in the scientific and technological fields affect art forms and accelerate their evolution. In time, the leading art movements of an era generate and exceed their own saturation of thresholds, transform their ‘deep-and-singular’ selves into ‘shallow-and-multiple’ selves. An art form that evolves by its internal dynamics and statics reaches the threshold of saturation, and finally becomes a ‘springboard’ upon which another art form can take further steps. This is how art forms evolve in interaction. In this context, video games have rapidly covered the path that cinema has taken over a long period.

By advancing through its evolution, video games now represent many narrative systems that provide a semantic reserve of form and content for both their own medium and the other mediums. These narrative systems have been inevitably subjected to the effects of technological developments. Meanwhile, concepts such as Mimesis, Diegesis, and Katharsis, which have remained valid since Aristotle, have dominated the narrative channels throughout the history of art given the enigmatic attractiveness of their singularities. As in everything, the principle of dialectic antagonism, which carries and expands all the layers of meaning by adding new particles as time progresses, stood against these concepts by revealing alternative systems like Brechtian, Modern and Postmodern narratives, particularly in theater and cinema. On the one hand, it can be claimed that there has always been a single narrative idea and it embodied in various mediums; on the other hand, it can also be claimed that each media could have inevitably created its own narrative system. In both cases, it is certain that almost every piece of art which conveyed by many other mediums or branches formed their own ontologic “present,” while feeding on the unalterable knowledge of the past. Sometimes by standing alongside the things they show, sometimes by standing up against, or sometimes by being only neutral observers to them.

Evolutionary big leaps in the history of art have always taken place with a dimensional expansion and Every successful thing goes beyond its predecessor. As the predecessor of video games, cinema took the first big leap and replicated the unique features of many previous art forms and synthesized them. The dimensional expansion here manifested as (detection of) movement. Afterward, video games replicated mostly all the features of cinema and others and synthesized them. The dimensional expansion here manifested as interactivity. Since video games synthesize unique features of various art forms, they have the qualified characteristics of expressing many meanings, elements, contents and methods that convey and construct narrative systems in various ways.

Objective

In this project, our Editorial Advisory Board and we will endeavor to read video games as one of the most potent and evolutionary representatives of narrativity, from a narrativist perspective without missing valuable arguments of ludologist perspective. As a collection of critical and cultural studies, this book aims to provide valuable knowledge of relevant theoretical and conceptual frameworks in both game studies and the theory of video games. This book also aims to be a manuscript that reassesses and interprets intensive topics of the history of video games from a contemporary and multidisciplinary perspective. I’ll be written for scholars, researchers, practitioners, and professionals who want to enhance their understanding and imply the knowledge of the relationship and correlation of video games, narrativity, and aesthetics.

Target Audience

The target audience of this book will be composed of scholars, researchers, practitioners, and professionals studying and/or working in the fields of game studies, history of video games, art and other arts, media arts, social and communication sciences, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies, media studies, critical and cultural studies, narration arts like cinema, theater, literature, photography and music, and game design.

Recommended Topics

Welcomed Topics Include (but also a combination of) the following:

• Analyzes through Narrative Discourse of Gerard Genette upon video games.
• Analyzes on video games with Erwin Panofsky’s Iconographic method.
• Linguistic Competence of Video Games: Emergence and maintenance of meaning codes, components, patterns, and systems.
• The appearance of Classic, Modern, and Postmodern narrative in video games.
• Exchange of narrative elements between art branches and video games.
• Analogical narrative design in video games.
• Relativist narrative design in video games.
• Perspectivist narrative design in video games.
• Structuralist narrative design in video games.
• Formalist narrative design in video games.
• Interpretivist narrative design in video games.
• Stylist narrative design in video games.
• Sophisticated content design in video games.
• Games that have complicated plots/superimpose narrative layers.
• Reading video games as a “representation system.”
• Games that replicate/transform cinematographic aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform photographic aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform literal aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform theatrical aesthetics.
• Games that replicate/transform musical aesthetics.
• The appearance of archetypes on video games/video game archetypes.
• The appearance of stereotypes on video games/video game stereotypes.
• The appearance of Kitsch, Pastiche, and Parody on video games.
• Mimetic, Diegetic, and Cathartic manifestations in video games.
• Epic, Poetic, and Didactic manifestations in video games.
• Theoretical analysis of narratology through video games.
• Historical analysis of narratology through video games.
• Sociological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Psychological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Anthropological analysis of narratology through video games.
• Dialogue, monologue & inner voice in the context of video game narrative.
• Narrative aesthetics through acting & dubbing in video games.
• The aesthetic function of the narrator in video games.

Submission Procedure

Scholars and researchers are invited to submit on or before Sept 18, 2019, a chapter proposal of 500 to 750 words (excluding bibliography) clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter and an author information 200 to 300 words. The authors will be notified by Oct 05, 2019 about the acceptance of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by Jan 16, 2020. All interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. 

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Narrative Aesthetics in Video Games.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates

Sept 18, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline 
Oct 5, 2019: Notification of Acceptance
Jan 16, 2020: Full Chapter Submissions
Mar 15, 2020: Review Results Returned
Apr 12, 2020: Revised Chapter Submission
May 10, 2020: Final Chapter Submission

Project Link
https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/4302

Editors

Deniz Denizel 
Bahcesehir University
deniz.denizel@comm.bau.edu.tr

Deniz Eyüce Şansal 
Bahcesehir University
deniz.eyucesansal@comm.bau.edu.tr

Share
Sep 052019
 

Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018” por Monica anderson e Jingjing jiang

“YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat are the most popular online platforms among teens. Fully 95% of teens have access to a smartphone, and 45% say they are online ‘almost constantly'”

+infos(estudo): LINK

Share
Sep 052019
 

“Do you want to find out how games can enhance traditional teaching and learning and would like to include games elements in your classroom? This MOOC for teachers will examine the opportunities but also challenges offered by integrating games into our teaching and learning and will provide practical examples of gaming tools and activities to use in your daily teaching practice. We will be learning through a mix of video, interactive activities and discussions as well as sharing of resources.”

Módulos:
Module 1: Why use Computer Games in the classroom?
Module 2: Using Games for Thematic Learning
Module 3: Learning Games
Module 4: What can we learn from games?
Module 5: Designing Games
Module 6: Why is it important to teach about games?

Começa dia 14 de outubro..

+infos(o curso): LINK

Share