Jun 132017
 

Call for Chapters: Handbook of Research on E-Assessment in Higher Education
http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/submit/2812 Editors

Ana Azevedo, CEOS.PP-ISCAP/IPP, aazevedo@iscap.ipp.pt
José Azevedo, CEOS.PP-ISCAP/IPP, jazevedo@iscap.ipp.pt

Call for Chapters
*Proposals Submission Deadline: July 15, 2017
Full Chapters Due: November 15, 2017
Submission Date: March 15, 2018*

Introduction
Assessment profoundly influences the motivation of those who learn, shapes
their perspectives about learning and therefore plays a key role in the
educational process. The introduction of different assessment systems has
important impacts throughout the educational process (Botički & Milašinović,
2008; Brown, 2001; Bull & Danson, 2001; Frankland, 2007; Garfield & Ben-Zvi,
2008; Holmes, 2015; Jacob, Issac, & Sebastian, 2006; Jarvis, Holford, &
Griffin, 2003; JISC, 2007; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Scouller, 1998;
Smith et al., 1996; Stödberg, 2012; Wild, Triggs, & Pfannkuch, 1997). In
the last years, the emergence of a new paradigm valuing the student as the
central subject in the construction of their learning, requires new
pedagogical approaches, and diversified methods (Botički & Milašinović,
2008; Llamas-Nistal, Fernández-Iglesias, González-Tato, & Mikic-Fonte,
2013; Mora, Sancho-Bru, Iserte, & Sánchez, 2012; Rod, Eiksund, & Fjaer,
2010). According to Redecker e Johannessen (2013), changes in pedagogical
practices and in the learning processes can only happen when also changing
assessment.
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) place challenges and at
the same time offer teachers tools to create differentiated learning
opportunities for students. The use of ICT in the assessment process is
thus unavoidable, through electronic assessment, or e-assessment. In this
case, ICT is used throughout the evaluation process from the design of the
tests to the storage of the results (Stödberg, 2012). One possible approach
is to develop specific environments for this purpose (Botički & Milašinović,
2008; Dascalu & Bodea, 2010; Llamas-Nistal et al., 2013). Another approach
is the use of the so-called Learning Management Systems (LMS) (Burrow,
Evdorides, Hallam, & Freer-hewish, 2005; Salas-Morera, Cubero-Atienza,
Redel-Macías, Arauzo-Azofra, & García-Hernández, 2012). LMS have the
advantage of providing a vast set of tools specifically designed for the
implementation of e-assessment. Among these tools we emphasize the quizzes,
which can encompass several types of questions, such as multiple-choice,
true/false, item matching, short answer, among others.
Considering its purpose, assessment may be formative and/or summative, or
diagnostic (Jacob et al., 2006; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Stödberg,
2012) (Jacob et al., 2006; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Stödberg, 2012).
In relevant scientific studies about this topic, it was found that the use
of formative evaluation or of both types, formative and summative
simultaneously, is more common than the use of summative evaluation alone (
Stödberg, 2012). E-assessment can be useful and can bring benefits to both
types of assessment, formative and summative (Bull & Danson, 2001;
McAlpine, 2002).Assessment can also be continuous. E-assessment “can
provide a powerful means of continuous assessment, providing rapid and
detailed feedback to students and academics about the learning process.”
(McAlpine, 2002, p. 8).
Stödberg (2012) presents a study in which e-assessment task were classified
in five categories namely: (i) closed questions, such as multiple-choice
questions and matching, (ii) open-ended questions, (iii) portfolio, (iv)
product, such as software, and (v) discussions between students.
There are applications of e-assessment in diverse areas such as geography
(Holmes, 2015; Rod et al., 2010; Wilson, Boyd, Chen, & Jamal, 2011),
management (Jacob et al., 2006), chemistry (Sorensen, 2013), medicine
(Harris et al., 2015), engineering (Botički & Milašinović, 2008; Burrow et
al., 2005; Jacob et al., 2006; Moscinska & Rutkowski, 2012) , and
Mathematics (Acosta-Gonzaga & Walet, 2013; Blanco & Ginovart, 2012; Ferrão,
2010; Gruttmann, Böhm, & Kuchen, 2008; Hauk, Powers, & Segalla, 2015;
Mathai & Olsen, 2013).
Historically, assessment in higher education consisted in the application
of final exams for each of the courses, the so-called final assessment. In
Europe, the Bologna process points out to another type of assessment,
encompassing diverse forms of assessments carried out during the
semester/academic year, the so-called continuous assessment. E-assessment
plays an important paper in this context, and has nowadays a growing
importance in Higher Education, not only in Europe, but around the world.

Objective
The primary objective of this book is to provide insights concerning the
use of e-assessment in Higher Education. This is a cutting-edge and
important topic that deserves a reflexion, and this book is an excellent
opportunity to do it. The book aims to provide the opportunity for a
reflexion on this important issue, increasing the understanding of using
e-assessment in the context of several different contexts, providing
relevant academic work, empirical research findings, and an overview of
this relevant field of study.

Target Audience
All those that need to assess the teaching-learning process, namely teacher
at all levels, from k1-k12 to college. Also professionals in the area of
skills certification, managers, researchers, academicians, practitioners,
and graduate students, are the target of this book.

Recommended Topics
Traditional vs e-assessment
E-assessment with portfolios
E-assessment with multiple choice questions and other closed formats
Feedback and e-assessment
e-assessment for e-learning
Analitics and e-assessment
Adaptive systems and e-assessment
E-assessment hardware and software
e-assessment tools, applications, and portals
Other topics of interest

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before July 15,
2017, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the
mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be
notified by July 25,2017 about the status of their proposals and sent
chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by November
15, 2017, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for
manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publ
ish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All
submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis.
Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.
Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted
to this book publication, Trust in Knowledge Management and Systems in
Organizations. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer
review editorial process.
All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM
online submission manager.

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group
Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea
Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business
Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For
additional information regarding the publisher, please visit
www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2018.

Important Dates
July 15, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline
July 25, 2017: Notification of Acceptance
November 15, 2017: Full Chapter Submission
January 15, 2018: Review Results Returned
February 28, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification
March 15, 2018: Final Chapter Submission

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