Sep 242022
 

Gostava de ler este artigo “Introduction on THINKING: Bioengineering of Science and Art” de Nima Rezaei e Amene Saghazadeh

“THINKING: Bioengineering of Science and Art is inclusive of the philosophy of thinking by using different knowledge works. This chapter is, therefore, no longer an attempt to introduce the book. Rather, we notice thoughts of different contexts and many relations among them, giving rise to various sets of integrations. One important result of this introduction is that integrated thinking represents the highest level of development, and scientific thinking may be only one of many integrant elements and a range of integrative relations—the point to which we devote our attention in THINKING: Bioengineering of Science and Art.”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Sep 242022
 

Um Journal que publica online as contribuições de vários âmbitos!

“IxD&A aims to offer an interdisciplinary arena where everybody can present top level researches and discuss ideas on the future of technology mediated experiences in the field of communication, learning, working, entertainment, healthcare, etc…) a future that can be made possible by a joint effort in research and education.
IxD&A, indeed, offers the ideal forum for meeting among frontier research, education, cutting edge technology development and application.
Indeed, there will be no future if research and education will not be able to meet the world of production, or, in other words if we will not be able to transfer the ‘lab’ into real life.”
“IxD&A is an open access journal that implements the Gold Open Access (OA) road to its contents (full, short, position papers, interviews and reviews) with no charge to the authors.”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Sep 172022
 

Gostava de ter acesso a “Teaching the Middle Ages through Modern Games Using, Modding and Creating Games for Education and Impact” editado por Robert Houghton

Da apresentação do livro faz parte: “Games can act as invaluable tools for the teaching of the Middle Ages. The learning potential of physical and digital games is increasingly undeniable at every level of historical study. These games can provide a foundation of information through their stories and worlds. They can foster understanding of complex systems through their mechanics and rules. Their very nature requires the player to learn to progress.

The educational power of games is particularly potent within the study of the Middle Ages. These games act as the first or most substantial introduction to the period for many students and can strongly influence their understanding of the era. Within the classroom, they can be deployed to introduce new and alien themes to students typically unfamiliar with the subject matter swiftly and effectively. They can foster an interest in and understanding of the medieval world through various innovative means and hence act as a key educational tool.

This volume presents a series of essays addressing the practical use of games of all varieties as teaching tools within Medieval Studies and related fields. In doing so it provides examples of the use of games at pre-university, undergraduate, and postgraduate levels of study, and considers the application of commercial games, development of bespoke historical games, use of game design as a learning process, and use of games outside the classroom. As such, the book is a flexible and diverse pedagogical resource and its methods may be readily adapted to the teaching of different medieval themes or other periods of history.”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Aug 272022
 

“ArtsIT takes place from November 21st to 22nd, as a hybrid event at the University of Algarve, Faro, Algarve, Portugal, and in Cyberspace. In this edition the CIAC – Centro de Investigação em Artes e Comunicação, will host the event. The CIAC is a research unit assessed by the Foundation for Science and Technology. It was created in 2008 as a result of the merger of two non-funded research centres: the Centre for Research in Communication Sciences and the Arts (University of Algarve) and the Centre for Research in Theatre and Cinema (Escola Superior de Teatro e Cinema do IPL). Currently, it brings together researchers from the University of Algarve (host institution), the School of Theatre and Cinema (Lisbon Polytechnic), the Instituto Superior da Maia, the Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, the Higher Institute of Advanced Technologies and the Open University. The Arts and Communication Research Centre currently has three active hubs: one at the Lisbon Theatre and Film School (IPL), another at the Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, dedicated to digital literacy and social inclusion and, finally, a third hub at the Open University, associated with the PhD in Media-Digital Art. This R&D Unit has been conducting innovative research in the field of artistic (visual arts, cinema, theatre) and cultural studies, communication and, more recently, literary studies (digital archives, digital critical editions), associating the production of dissemination platforms with the study of ways of communicating scientific knowledge in the designated areas. Therefore, it has maintained an interdisciplinary character since it first opened. Its objectives are to develop applied research and research networks in the arts (in the broadest sense of the word) and communication, and to implement artistic creation laboratories in the areas of theatre, cinema and other arts, namely in the Mediterranean region. Since its foundation, it has promoted and actively collaborated in several partnerships in the artistic and cultural activities of the Algarve, where it is based, through specific collaboration agreements with Municipal Councils, Cultural Associations and with the Algarve Regional Directorate for Culture. It is currently an important stakeholder in the region. The research produced at the CIAC is often disseminated by the surrounding community through the multiple extension activities promoted, as well as discussed in international networks.

The ArtsIT conference is considered a perfect partner to CIAC, as outlined above, as it offers a bringing together an even wider array of cross-/inter-/trans-disciplinary researchers, practitioners, artists, and academia to present and discuss the symbiosis between art (in its widest definition) and information technology applied in a variety of distinct fields. Since 2009 ArtsIT has become acknowledged as a leading scientific forum for the dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the intersection between art, science, culture, performing arts, media, and technology. The role of artistic practice using digital media is also to serve as a tool for analysis and critical reflection on how technologies influence our lives, culture, and society. ArtsIT is therefore not only a place to discuss technological progress but also a place to reflect on the impact of art and technology on sustainability, responsibility, and human dignity. Besides the main track, the event also focuses on the advances seen in two areas that have significantly contributed to the field in the last years, namely, virtualization and artificial intelligence with special sessions (see call for special sessions below).

Topics include the following but are open for additional:
Virtual Museums and Curatorial Practices;
Interactive Art & Interactive Installations;
Augmented Reality & Virtual Reality;
Virtual Worlds;
Metaverse, Avatars, and Presence;
Games & Interactivity;
Gamification;
Exhibition;
Design;
Augmented Performing Arts;
Digital Distribution of Performing Arts;
Audio Art & Sound Design; New Media;
Technologies Information;
Visualization; Generative Design;
Artificial Intelligence & Big Data;
Digital Cultural Heritage;
Digital Artworks Addressing the Sustainable Development Goals or other such contemporary topics;
Theoretical Research in the Fields of Media Technology; Studies that Explore the Role of Media Art in Society;
and more 

+infos(oficial): LINK

Aug 272022
 

The War on Terror beyond the barrel of a gun: The procedural rhetorics of the boardgame Labyrinth
Thomas Ambrosio, Jonathan Ross

“Utilizing Bogost’s procedural rhetoric framework in his book Persuasive Games, this article examines Labyrinth, a boardgame that simulates the conflict between the United States and global terrorism. The authors systematically integrate ludology (rules/gameplay) and narratology (narratives/representations) to illustrate how Labyrinth was intentionally designed so that players became active participants in a narrative about how good governance undermines the sources of terrorism and the counterproductive nature of militarized counterterrorism, as well as bear witness to the agency of the Muslim world and the region’s political dynamism on the tabletop. This is a very different account of the War on Terror than has previously been studied in the literature, which has focused overwhelmingly on first-person shooter videogames and, in turn, has provided a very limited range of how this conflict can be represented in ludic form. However, Labyrinth is not alone, and the wargames that many players grew up with have given way to a variety of boardgames which approach complex historical or contemporary situations and environments beyond simply killing one’s enemies. This represents a diverse, but largely untapped, resource already in the public space and ready to be investigated. Media studies can therefore benefit from considering how boardgames similar to Labyrinth present alternative ways in which the ‘real world’ has been, and indeed can be, translated through popular culture objects.”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Aug 272022
 

“The theme of the special issue is the Futures of Games and Game Studies.

During its around 20 years of existence, game studies has put computer games on the academic map. The field has provided a response to effect studies by demonstrating that games are social arenas of intrinsic value to the individuals that use them, and that they are cultural products able to comment on society in new ways. From a more practical perspective, technical oriented game studies has driven developments in artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

But where will game studies go in the future? What are the challenges that game studies will face as computer games mature and become a medium not only for entertainment but also for politics and activism? What will happen to games as technological developments take new and unforeseen directions? How can we as a scholarly community be able not only to respond to these rapid developments but also be able to define what games should be in the future? This special issue will be an attempt to illuminate potential avenues for the future of game studies.

This special issue call is based on the Futures of Games and Game Studies symposium and doctoral consortium organized at the IT University of Copenhagen in April 2022. Participants who attended the event are encouraged to submit, but with this call we also invite submissions from the larger academic community. ”

+infos(oficial): LINK

Aug 272022
 

Top-down Design of a CS Curriculum for a Computer Games BA
Nuno Fachada e Nélio Códices

“Computer games are complex products incorporating software, design and art. Consequently, their development is a multidisciplinary effort, requiring professionals from several fields, who should nonetheless be knowledgeable across disciplines. Due to the variety of skills required, and in order to train these professionals, computer game development (GD) degrees have been appearing in North America and Europe since the late 1990s. Following this trend, several GD degrees have emerged in Portugal. Given the lack of specialized academic staff, not uncommon in younger scientific areas, some of these degrees “borrowed” computer science (CS) programs and faculty within the same institution, leading in some cases to a disconnect between CS theory and practice and the requirements of GD classes. In this paper, we discuss our experience in adapting the CS curriculum of a three-year computer games BA in accordance with GD requirements. We used a top-down approach, where the game engine used for GD informs the choice of CS topics and programming languages lectured in the CS curriculum. The discussion is centered around the choices taken and the theoretical and empirical rationale behind our decisions. Preliminary empirical results indicate a substantial increase in GD project quality and a clear improvement in the students’ technical skills, as well as in their experimentation and adaptation capabilities.”

+infos(fonte): LINK

Aug 272022
 

Conferencia IEEE International conference on ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE & VIRTUAL REALITY
“Welcome to the 5th IEEE International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Virtual Reality! IEEE AIVR is a unique event, addressing researchers and industries from all areas of AI as well as Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality. It provides an international forum for the exchange between those fields, to present advances in the state of the art, identify emerging research topics, and together define the future of these exciting research domains. We invite researchers from Virtual Reality (VR) as well as Augmented Reality (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR) to participate and submit their work to the program. Likewise, work on AI that has a relation to any of these fields or potential for the usage in any of them is welcome

AREAS OF INTEREST
We invite researchers from Virtual, as well as Augmented Reality (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR) to participate and submit their work to the program. Likewise, any work on AI that has a relation to any of these fields or potential for the usage in any of them is welcome. Areas of interest for the technical program include but are not limited to:
Systems, including techniques, performance, and implementation
System components, virtual reality platforms
AI platforms for VR/AR, cloud-based platforms
Data generation, manipulation, analysis, and validation
Tracking, physical environment mapping, registration
Vision for VR/AR, deep learning for VR/AR
Standards and theoretical models for AI and/or VR
Content creation and modelling
Generation of immersive environments and virtual worlds
Environments for gaming, simulation, training
Visualization, optimized and realistic rendering
Geometric modelling and design in immersive settings
Animations, crowd-simulation, character modelling
Customization and personalization (e.g., for training)
Cognitive aspects, perception, user behaviour
Semantic and cognitive aspects of virtual reality
Depth perception, multimodal perception
Behaviour and activity generation
Representations of self (avatars), embodiment, presence
Virtual agents, conversational non-player characters (NPCs)
Understanding and modelling human behaviour, emotions
AI technologies for VR/AR
Search, planning, reasoning
Knowledge representation
Natural language processing
Robotics and perception
Multi-agent systems
Statistical learning, deep learning
Interactions / interactive and responsive environments
Multimodal interaction and experiences in VR/AR
Machine learning for multimodal interaction
Human-virtual user/agent interaction
Human to human communication in virtual environments, collaboration and communication
Dialogue modelling and generation, conversational and natural language interfaces, speech interaction for AR/VR
Navigation and spatial orientation in VR
Interaction devices, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI)
Applications and use cases
Data and knowledge representation, problem solving
Visualization concepts (including, e.g., spatial visualization, multimodality for visualization) and domains (e.g., scientific visualization)
Arts, leisure, and entertainment
Gaming and game narratives, immersive storytelling and gameplay
Education, training, simulation
Business, prototyping, productivity, design and architecture, evaluation
Telepresence and collaboration, social interactions
Healthcare and therapy
Evaluation metrics and methodologies
Quality of Experience (QoE)
Ethical and societal aspects of AI and VR/AR
Sensory vulnerability
Privacy and data
Social isolation, desensitization
Overestimation of abilities, psychiatric
Unpalatable fantasies, torture/virtual criminality

+infos(oficial): https://aivr.science.uu.nl/index.html

Aug 052022
 

SonifyIt: Towards Transformative Sound for All Robots
Brian J. Zhang; Noel Sigafoos; Rabecka Moffit; Ibrahim Syed; Lili S. Adams; Jason Fick; Naomi T. Fitter

do resumo consta:
Transformative robot sound yields perceptual, functional, and social benefits in human-robot interactions, but broader research and implementation related to this topic is impeded by the lack of a common sound generation system for robots. Such a system could enable a wide array of situated robot sound studies, smoother collaborations with sound designers than current state of the art methods, and broader adoption of transformative robot sound. Based on other successful open-source projects in the robotics community, we integrated Robot Operating System, a popular robotics middleware, and Pure Data, a visual programming language for multimedia, to enable live sound synthesis and sample playback for robots. This sound generation system synthesized sound in an in-the-wild pilot study with positive qualitative results. Furthermore, an online within-subjects survey study with N=96 showed that the proposed sound system made the robot seem warmer, happier, and more energetic. This work benefits robotics researchers by providing the current sound system as a validated artifact and demonstrating its potential impact on broader robotics applications. We plan to develop this software into an open-source package: SonifyIt.

Aug 052022
 

Uma conferência sobre o tema de videojogos..
“The 18th Foundations of Digital Games (FDG) held in Lisbon, Portugal, invites all research contributions in the form of papers, posters, demos, doctoral consortium applications, as well as panels, competitions, and workshop proposals. We invite contributions from within and across any discipline committed to advancing knowledge on the foundations of games: computer science, engineering, mathematics, natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, arts, and design.

das traks:
Technical Game Development, Novel Controllers
This track is for research that advances game development practices. This track is suitable for papers on game engines, frameworks, computer graphics techniques, rendering, animation, networking, novel interaction techniques (such as virtual reality, augmented reality, and alternate controllers) and other technical areas. Furthermore, the submission of work focusing on the development of novel hardware interfaces are also welcome. This track focuses on the technological aspects of game development and offers a venue for researchers and developers to share technological advancements of the field. Please consider that papers that focus more on Artificial Intelligence, or Player Analytics should be submitted in their respective tracks.

Game Design, Studio Practices, Novel Mechanics, Novel Experiences
This track is for papers that examine, validate, and refute game making practices, patterns, mechanics, dynamics, or aesthetics. This track also favors alternative methods of game design, practical examinations of user-testing protocols, exploration of alternative controllers, study on human-computer interaction in games and the empirical analysis of game-making processes, and more. Methods in submissions can include case studies, A/B testing, literature reviews, comparative analysis, and other appropriate efforts. This track focuses on game design and the influence of games, their mechanics or alternative controller systems on players, and different methods for playtesting.

Game Analytics and Visualization
This track invites authors to submit research related to data science, analytics, and game data visualization, as well as analyzing player behavior. Techniques such as player modeling, churn analysis, player profiling, business intelligence and performance evaluation or workflow optimization applied to the field of digital games, are all suitable submissions for this track. Submissions spanning across quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method approaches are also encouraged. Novel methodological approaches are valued in this track. Examples of encouraged and valued submissions include game data visualization; behavioral analysis (or other) game data; advances in methodological approaches that analyze and/or visualize game data; application or expanding novel statistical methods; machine learning such as deep learning, clustering, or other AI algorithms; game data mining; and novel visualization and analytical methods for game data.

Game Artificial Intelligence
This track focuses on the many applications of computational and artificial intelligence to the design, play, development, and improvement of games, as well as autonomous game testing. Relevant topics for submissions in this track include general game-playing AI, procedural and player-driven content generation, mixed-initiative authoring tools, computational narrative, believable agents, multi-agent systems and AI assisted game design. This track also encourages authors to push the boundaries of autonomous content generation such as game content orchestration, procedural game assets (e.g., audio, graphics, or game mechanics), computational creativity and affective computing within the context of digital games. This track focuses on more experimental technically driven aspects of game development, such as developing algorithms capable of automating certain aspects of games, systems that dynamically influence certain aspects of play or tools that actively help developers during the development process.

Game Criticism and Analysis
This track invites submissions with perspectives in the digital humanities, cultural studies, critical theory, and related fields. Submissions are encouraged from scholars engaging in narrative, visual and software studies approach to games and games criticism using methodologies such as archival research, hermeneutics, and oral history. This track will also consider critical, theoretical and/or historical analysis of games, and game genres from perspectives such as (but not limited to) postcolonial theory, feminism, historicism, subaltern studies, queer theory, the environmental humanities, and psychoanalysis. Socio-cultural critiques of the game-making culture are equally encouraged submissions for this track.

Games Beyond Entertainment
This track is dedicated to game inclusion, game accessibility, and game development for activism, citizenship, health, games as therapy, education, heritage, and other purposes beyond entertainment. Digital, mixed, analog, and locative games and play-spaces are all relevant to this track. Co-creation, participatory design, and game creation kits are relevant for this track. For games in education and training, this includes teaching and assessment methods, tools and techniques, and educational game-related programs.

Submission Deadlines:
Submission Deadline: 4th November 2022
Workshops, Panels and Competition Deadlines: 21st October 2022
Late-Breaking Paper: 27th of January 2023
Games & Demos Deadline: 27th of January 2023
Conference Dates: 11th-14th of April 2023

+infos(oficial): http://fdg2023.org/